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Pupil Premium

                          Pupil Premium funding at Robert Bakewell School 2016 - 2017

 

The government gives the school an additional amount of money for every child who meets certain criteria. These criteria are based around family income. Approximately 26% of Robert Bakewell children fulfil the criteria for this funding. In 2016-2017 this pupil premium funding at Robert Bakewell School is likely to be £120,100.

 

This is how we are spending the money in 2016 – 2017:

 

  • Additional ‘reading champion’ teacher (outstanding reading and phonics practitioner);
  • After school catch-up clubs for pupil premium children in year six;
  • Additional teacher for children in Reception classes, based outdoors;
  • One-to-one tuition (with an experienced teacher) for pupils in receipt of pupil premium;
  • Regular release time for outstanding teachers to work with pupil premium children;
  • Input from the Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator for children in receipt of pupil premium who are also on the SEN register;
  • Additional Educational Psychologist time to pay for early assessments of children receiving pupil premium who are on the SEN register. (We pay for this separately through pupil premium, so that other children’s appointments are not put back.)
  • Three Teaching Assistants to read 1-1 daily with targeted pupils in key stage one and lower key stage two;
  • Additional teaching assistant groups;
  • Behaviour support staff to work with children who receive pupil premium and who also have challenging behaviour;
  • A Welfare Worker to support families one day a week;
  • Breakfast club for targeted children;
  • Cover for teachers to meet with Pupil Premium Lead Teacher to discuss pupil progress and support;
  • Free milk;
  • Free piano, guitar or steel pans tuition;
  • School trip subsidy – eligible children pay (at most) half price on school trips. This includes a substantial figure to fund the year six residential for eligible children;
  • School uniform – eligible children receive free school uniform at the beginning of every year.

 

Pupil Premium spending 2015 - 2016

 

In 2015-2016, we received £113,852 in pupil premium funds. This is how we spent it, and what impact we had:

 

  • Additional teacher for children in Reception classes, based outdoors;
  • One-to-one tuition (with an experienced teacher) for pupils in receipt of pupil premium;
  • Regular release time for outstanding teachers to work with pupil premium children;
  • Input from the Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator for children in receipt of pupil premium who are also on the SEN register;
  • Additional Educational Psychologist time to pay for early assessments of children receiving pupil premium who are on the SEN register.
  • Three Teaching Assistants to read 1-1 daily with targeted pupils in key stage one and lower key stage two;
  • Additional teaching assistant groups;
  • Behaviour support staff to work with children who receive pupil premium and who also have challenging behaviour;
  • A Welfare Worker to support families one day a week;
  • Breakfast club for targeted children;
  • Cover for teachers to meet with Pupil Premium Lead Teacher to discuss pupil progress and support;
  • Free milk;
  • Free piano, guitar or steel pans tuition;
  • School trip subsidy;
  • School uniform – eligible children receive free school uniform at the beginning of every year.

 

Impact:

 

  • Nationally, children who qualify for pupil premium funding generally do less well at school than children who do not qualify for pupil premium. This is known as the ‘pupil premium gap’. Our pupil premium gap was bigger than the national average, meaning that our children were further behind their peers than children in many other schools. We needed to make sure that we changed this, and we have done so in almost every year group.
  • With the exception of two year groups, our pupil premium gap is narrower than the national average. This means that children who receive pupil premium funding are catching up with their peers, and they do as well as pupils in other schools nationally. In year one, there is no gap between children who qualify for pupil premium and those who don’t, meaning both groups of children do equally well.
  • In two year groups, including last year’s year six, the gaps remain wide. Our children who receive pupil premium funding did not do as well as we expected in their year six SAT tests, and we are looking into the reasons for this. We have reallocated some of our pupil premium money to try and make sure that our children who receive pupil premium do better next year.
  • We also use pupil premium funding to support children's welfare and behaviour. The impact of this can be difficult to quantify, but we have had some good successes, with targeted children's behaviour improving and one child staying in school rather than being permanently excluded.

 

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